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Posts tagged "Linux Mint"

Today "Jump" was available for free on Amazon as the app of the day and since it's nearly 7 quids on google play store, I downloaded. For windows and Mac users they have a pretty straight forward set-up but as usual for Linux it means some work but in the end it leaves you with a set-up you can trust and feel secure about. There are three things that need to be set-up for this to work: 1. Linux Mint machine should be set-up for x11vnc and ssh servers 2. Router firewall should be configured to allow inbound traffic on specific ports. 3. Jump or equivalent vnc viewer should be configured on the android device. 1. Linux Mint machine should be set-up for x11vnc and ssh servers 1.1: Install X11VNC by typing following command in terminal: sudo apt-get install x11vnc 1.2: Create a password for VNC using following command in terminal and providing a password and answering yes for the prompt to store password in a file: x11vnc -storepasswd 1.3: Now to ensure that X11VNC starts at boot go to menu and type start, click on startup application as shown in the screenshot below: hen in the window that this will open click on "Add" and enter a "Name" and in "Command" field enter x11vnc -forever -xkb -usepw -display :0 as shown below. VNC set-up on machine is complete. 1.4 Now install openssh-server using following command on terminal: sudo apt-get install openssh-server 1.5 We will need to change some parameters in ssh configuration for making it secure as by default it allows root login but I dont want that for remote access and would advice most regular users to do so as well. So we will first make a backup of existing configuration file using the command below: sudo cp /etc/ssh/sshd_config ~ 1.6 Now, we will edit the actual config file using following command: gksudo gedit /etc/ssh/sshd_config 1.7 Once the file is open change the parameter "PermitRootLogin" to "no". It's on line 27 for me. 1.8 Now the default port for ssh is 22 but I recommend changing it to something else such as 5432. To do so change the parameter "Port" from 22 to whatever port you want to put. In this example it will be 5432. For me "Port" parameter is on line 5. 1.9 Save the changes and close gedit. 1.10 Now we will restart the ssh server using following command in terminal sudo restart ssh For Arch, you can use the command: sudo systemctl start sshd followed by sudo systemctl enable sshd.service to ensure ssh daemon is enabled at startup. 1.11 Restart the machine and machine set-up is done. 2. Router firewall should be configured to allow inbound traffic on specific ports. This may involve different step from those given below depending on the router in use. Following steps are meant for configuring the sky router. However principle is same. We will be creating specific service definition and port on router and then create a firewall rule that allows inbound traffic and directs it to Linux machine we configured above. 2.1 Type following command on terminal: ifconfig 2.2 this will list lot of numbers, what we are interested in is the number just after "inet addr:" under wlan0. It will be something like 192.168.0.10. 2.3 Open sky router config through browser using 192.168.0.1 and click on "Security". You will need to enter router username and password. 2.4 Then click on "Services" and then click on "Add Custom Services". 2.5 Enter as shown in Figure 4 and Start Port as 5900, Finish Port as 5900 and click on "Apply". 5900 is default port for display 0 in VNC. If you have changed it like me you will need to enter that port. To change port you will need to use "x11vnc -forever -xkb -usepw -autoport nnnn -display :0" option in step 1.3. This is not required for security but in case you have two different machines then this approach will come handy. 2.6 Now click on "Add Custom Services" again and this time enter as shown in next screenshot. Start Port and End Port should be same as entered in step 1.8, so for this example it will be 5432. Then click on "Apply". 2.7 Now we need to set the firewall for these services. To do so, click on "Firewall Rules" then click on "Add" under inbound services. 2.8 Configure fields as shown in next screen-shot below and click on "Apply": 2.9 Now we will do same for SSH, so again click on "Add" under inbound services and configure fields as shown in screen-shot below and click on "Apply": 2.10 Click on "Apply" under "Inbound Services". 2.11 In browser on the router management page, click on "Advanced" > "Remote Management" and on this screen make note of the IP address (number after http:// in red box in next screen-grab) shown under "Remote Management Address". 2.12 Go to https://www.dlinkddns.com/signin and create an account. Refer this page for the how-to (http://www.dlinkddns.com/howto) and you will need to use the IP from step 2.11 above as the host. At the end of it you will have a hostname like "yourname.dlinkddns.com", username and password for logging in to dlinkddns site. 2.13 Once this is done, go to the browser with sky router management and click on "Advanced">"Dynamic DNS" and fill as shown in screen-shot below: Host Name: Hostname from Step 2.12 (yourname.dlinkddns.com in this example) User Name: D-Link site username Password: D-Link site password 2.14 Once above information is filled, click on "Apply" and then click on "Show Status". It should open a separate window and showing the message "request successful". Sky Router is now configured. 3. Jump or an equivalent VNC viewer should be configured on the android device. 3.1 On the android device open Jump and click on the "+" sign in right hand corner. 3.2 In the "Address" Field enter the hostname from 2.12 (yourname.dlinkddns.com in this example) and select connection type as "VNC" and click save. 3.4 Change the "Authentication Method" to "VNC Password" 3.5 Tap on "SSH Tunnel", click on "Enabled" checkbox. 3.6 In Username enter the username used to log into the machine configured above in Step 1. 3.7 In Host Name, use the the hostname from 2.12 (yourname.dlinkddns.com in this example) 3.8 Change the port to one used in 1.8. So in this case 5432. 3.9 Password can be left empty and when asked during connection provide the one used to log on to the machine with this username. 3.10 Press back button and click on entry. You will be shown a SSH key notification, say ok. Then you will be asked for a password, provide the password you use to log onto your machine with the username provided in 3.6. 3.11 Then you will be asked for the VNC password, provide the password from step 1.2. You will now be able to view your desktop on your android machine. All Done !!!

Linux Mint on Android through VNC and Jump

Today "Jump" was available for free on Amazon as the app of the day and since it's nearly 7 quids on google play store, I downloaded. For windows and Mac users they have a pretty straight forward set-up but as usual for Linux it means some work but
I have an old Sony VAIO which is not in it's best of health and has long been really a companion for my telly, faithfully streaming media from bbc iplayer, youtube, dailymotion and likes. Internet enabled TV arrived in my home long long back :). Now the thing with this laptop is that it's kinda gimpy - inbuilt keyboard won't work, battery is dead and it hangs on life with constant supply of energy from the AC source on the wall and the one thing that helps me load new OS on this machine - the optical reader - is temperamental and may or may not work and is moody in selecting which CD / DVD it will read and which it won't. It does in particular like CD's authored by Linux Format guys though. Writing is a skill it has forgotten long back and if it reads something, anything I am found celebrating. Anyway, I had ubuntu installed on this laptop for quite some time but as this laptop has one more flaw - the nvidia graphic card - and the latest update from ubuntu broke the nvidia drivers which aren't all that well supported anyway, I was being forced to reformat the machine. So I decided to try a new distro named Bodhi Linux which is very cool and uses Enlightenment as desktop which is very very good and way better than Unity and some might argue even Gnome 3.2. However, in order to do so I had to cross the hurdle of burning a CD that my laptop's Optical Drive will find intresting enough to read. I have checked and rechecked the BIOS of this laptop and there is no way to make BIOS understand that it can boot from USB. The only options it provides are Hard Drive, Floppy Disk, Optical Reader and Network Boot. None of these were particularly useful for reasons explained above and unfortunately I was hitting the wall. So I started looking for alternative ways to get Bodhi Linux installed. Alternative is what I found in Plop Boot Manager. Now open source enthusiasts at this point be aware, this nifty piece of software is not open source but it is so useful that this one minor flaw must be completely ignored. It gives you options to boot from USB in several ways - you can burn a CD and fool BIOS to boot from CD onto plop boot manager which in turn allows you to boot from device of your choice aka USB, it can also be put on floppy or the option that I have used - install on hard drive and configured through GRUB. So presented below without further ado is the guide to how you can install this on your hard drive but before I do so a quick thanks to several boards and posts I referred in the process of making this work: Steps: (Please note that these instructions will work for machines that have one of these OS installed: Bodhi Linux and Ubuntu variants. For other linux versions it should be on similar lines) Download the Plop Boot Manager (plpbt-5.0.14.zip file) on the machine where you want to achieve the result from http://www.plop.at/en/bootmanager/download.html Extract the zip file in folder where it was downloaded. In my case I have my browser setting set to download everything to "Download" folder. Now open the terminal and type following command relevant to your distro: For UBUNTU: gksu nautilus /boot For Bodhi: sudo pcmanfm /boot You will be presented with a dialogue box to enter password. Once you enter the password you will be presented the contents of boot folder as shown below. Now (a) Go to the extracted plpbt-5.0.14 from step 2, click on Linux folder (b) Then copy the files - "plpbt.bin" and "plpcfgbt" and paste them in the boot folder opened through step 3. Once the files are copied in boot folder, double click on folder named grub and there open the file named "grub.cfg" in texteditor. Once the file is opened, press "Ctrl+f" and search for string "END /etc/grub.d/10_linux". Now copy the text as highlighted in screen below and paste it in a new text-editor window. In the new text editor after pasting the four lines from above a) Edit the fourth line so it reads as below: linux16 /boot/plpbt.bin b) Complete the block in new editor to read as below, keeping the first three lines intact from what was copied in step 5 from grub.cfg file. In our example it will read as below: menuentry "Plop Bootmanager" { insmod ext2 set root='(hd0,6)' search --no-floppy --fs-uuid --set cb7a6eb7-b355-4d0f-865e-f7312880f887 linux16 /boot/plpbt.bin } Once again, this is important so remember the final structure will be achieved by following steps below. Copy Paste this in Line 1: menuentry "Plop Bootmanager" { Next three lines remain same as copied from step 5: insmod ext2 set root='(hd0,6)' search --no-floppy --fs-uuid --set cb7a6eb7-b355-4d0f-865e-f7312880f887 Then the fourth line will be edited to look as shown below. You can copy paste this in fourth line. linux16 /boot/plpbt.bin Fifth line will be closing bracket. } Now open another terminal window and type following command relevant to your distro: For UBUNTU: gksu nautilus /etc/grub.d ** For Bodhi:** sudo pcmanfm /etc/grub.d You will be presented with a dialogue box to enter password. Once you enter the password you will be presented the contents of boot folder as shown below. Open the file 40_custom (highlighted in screenshot above) in texteditor - gedit on ubuntu or leafpad on Bodhi and paste the block from step 6(b) in this file and save it. #!/bin/sh exec tail -n +3 $0 # This file provides an easy way to add custom menu entries. Simply type the # menu entries you want to add after this comment. Be careful not to change # the 'exec tail' line above. menuentry "Plop Bootmanager" { insmod ext2 set root='(hd0,6)' search --no-floppy --fs-uuid --set cb7a6eb7-b355-4d0f-865e-f7312880f887 linux16 /boot/plpbt.bin } Very Important - Press "Enter" at-least twice after pasting to ensure there are atleast two new lines below closing bracket. Close all windows and open terminal once again and type following command: sudo update-grub Now open /boot/grub/grub.conf and you should find the following entry on it: ### BEGIN /etc/grub.d/40_custom ### # This file provides an easy way to add custom menu entries. Simply type the # menu entries you want to add after this comment. Be careful not to change # the 'exec tail' line above. menuentry "Plop Bootmanager" { insmod ext2 set root='(hd0,6)' search --no-floppy --fs-uuid --set cb7a6eb7-b355-4d0f-865e-f7312880f887 linux16 /boot/plpbt.bin } ### END /etc/grub.d/40_custom ### Now reboot your machine with your Live USB plugged in. If you already dual boot your grub will show on restart and will have an additional option in the end - "Plop Bootmanager". If however, you just have single OS ubuntu, press shift once the bios logo shows up and keep holding for getting the system to show Grub. Once Grub is shown it will have the additional "Plop Bootmanager" menu entry on grub. Select the "Plop Bootmanager" and press enter. Plop Bootmanager will show option to boot from USB. It was third option for me. Select and press enter. If your Live USB is working, you will be able to load OS from it. This is it. You can check the video below: Please do let me know in comments if you found this useful. If there are any other ways I will be keen to hear those too.

How to boot from USB when BIOS does not have the option.

I have an old Sony VAIO which is not in it's best of health and has long been really a companion for my telly, faithfully streaming media from bbc iplayer, youtube, dailymotion and likes. Internet enabled TV arrived in my home long long back :). Now the thing with this laptop
What is Open Workbench? Open Workbench is a Project Planning Software comparable to Microsoft Project. There are mixed views on whether it is truly open source or not but as it is considered a very good alternative for Microsoft Project and it is free to download, it is something I as a Project Manager would want to know about. After all some of my clients are going to be using this. :) Now then, as of writing this article Open Workbench is not available from the well publicised site www.openworkbench.org which seems to be down. Instead it is available for download fromhttp://www.itdesign.de/en/products-solutions/open-workbench.html As you will find that the installer is an exe and the product is made for Windows platform and requires Java Runtime Environment, we will need to either use Windows in virtualbox or Wine. I am going to cover below the steps for installing the software on Linux using Wine. Steps to install Open Workbench and JRE on Wine V1.2.2 in Linux Mint: Install JRE in wine Install Open Workbench in wine Configure wine to play well with Open Workbench Configure icon to launch Open Workbench What do we need? We will need to download the installer exe file from http://www.itdesign.de/en/products-solutions/open-workbench.html As the product requires Java Runtime Environment, we will need to download the JRE for windows. We will need access to system32 folder of a WindowsXP machine or in Virtualbox. Step 1: Install JRE in wine You can download the JRE file from http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/java/javase/downloads/index.html . Remember, we only need JRE not JDK so click the download button in second column. This will open another page for you to select which JRE package you want to download. Click on the radio-button to accept license agreement and then select Windows x86 Offline for download. I am assuming that your hardware is 32 bit, if not please select Windows x64 but it will not have the offline version and I have no way of checking if it will work or not; so please leave a comment either way as it will help others. a) Copy the downloaded (jre-6u25-windows-i586.exe) file into .wine/drive_C/Program Files. You can do this using GUI on Linux Mint using steps below: Goto MENU-ALL APPLICATIONS-WINE and click on BROWSE C: DRIVE Click on Program Files folder. Paste the copied exe file here. b) Right click on the exe file and select "open with wine windows program loader". c) Follow the installation wizard. Once completed move on to next step. Step 2: Install Open Workbench in wine a) Download the “Open Workbench” installer file(Open_Workbench_Setup_1.1.6.exe) and copy it into .wine/drive_C/Program Files. TIP: You can use Step 1 bullet "a" to reach drive_c and then click on windows folder and then on system32 folder. b) Right click on the exe file and select "open with wine windows program loader". TIP: You can use Step 1 bullet "b" to reach drive_c and then click on windows folder and then on system32 folder. c) Follow the installation wizard. Step 3: Configure wine to play well with Open Workbench Due to some bug identified in Wine V1.2 the odbc32.dll file does not work and gives the error “err:module:attach_process_dlls “odbc32.dll” failed to initialize, aborting” if you try to run file from Terminal. The following workaround is one suggested on Launchpad (https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+source/wine1.2/+bug/572393) and does solve the problem. I have just tried to make it easier to follow the instructions by providing screenshots and explaining each step. On the WindowsXP machine / virtualbox goto following location – C:\WINDOWS\system32 Now copy odbc32.dll and odbcint.dll files onto the Linux machine at this location - .wine/drive_c/windows/system32 . TIP: You can use Step 1 bullet "a" to reach drive_c and then click on windows folder and then on system32 folder. Now goto wine configuration (On Linux Mint: MENU-ALL APPLICATIONS-WINE-CONFIGURE WINE) Click on Libraries tab. From the dropdown select odbc32 and click add. Click OK Step 4: Configure Open Workbench icon to launch the application Open terminal (MENU - TERMINAL) Type: wine ~/.wine/drive_c/Program\ Files/Open\ Workbench/bin/npWBench.exe Once Open Workbench is opened we are sure the command works. Select this command and right click and select copy. TIP: You can also press Ctrl+Shift+C to copy the selected text from terminal Close "Open Workbench" and goto icon in MENU-ALL APPLICATIONS-WINE. Right click the "Open Workbench" icon and click on "Edit Properties". In Command click on browse and navigate to following location: .wine/drive_c/Program Files/Open Workbench/bin/ and select the file npWBench.exe. Now click "OK" This is it. You are ready to use Open workbench on Linux using wine.

Install Open Workbench and JRE on Wine in Linux Mint

What is Open Workbench? Open Workbench is a Project Planning Software comparable to Microsoft Project. There are mixed views on whether it is truly open source or not but as it is considered a very good alternative for Microsoft Project and it is free to download, it is something I
While the majority of settings are covered in my previous post here I found that each time I switched off my printer, it used to change it's IP address and I had to repeat Steps 7 to 16 each time. My printing and scanning needs are pretty limited so I never bothered working out a solution until today and knowing what I now know, it was quite a simple and quick solution I should have done this on the first place. Anyway as they say better late than never. :) So to carry out the magical transformation to your printing experience follow the steps below: On your printer (actual machine not on laptop / computer) go to Settings (Press the button with Wrench and Screwdriver symbol as shown in picture). Using left arrow navigate to Network Settings (Computer and Printer icon) Click OK button. Using down arrow navigate to "General Setup" and click OK button. Printer will show the question "After changing the settings, network may be disconnected. Continue?" and present options Yes and No with No selected (highlighted in Yellow.) Using left arrow move to Yes and press OK. Printer will now show the screen for "Printer Name Setup", do not change anything. Just Click OK to proceed to next screen. Now printer will show screen for TCP/IP screen with two options Auto which is selected by default and highlighted in yellow and Manual. Here using down arrow key select Manual. Click OK button. The screen will show current IP address assigned to printer something like 192.168.1.66. Now I am assuming that you have already followed part 1 of this tutorial so on your laptop open the file epkowa.conf from /etc/sane.d. You can also open this file by typing the following command in terminal gedit /etc/sane.d/epkowa.conf Note down the IP address you entered last time 192.168.1.60 below usb and scsi. (Line 12 on my file.) Now on your printer change IP address to match the one on last step. To do so, first click on left arrow on printer to reach the last digit of displayed IP address and then adjust the number using up or down arrow. Once it is same as that on epkowa.conf file (192.168.1.60 in this example), click OK button. Now continue to click OK button on all remaining screens till you reach Network Settings screen (About 5 times) Press OK one final time and that's it you are done. If you are to now switch off and switch on the printer and test scan it should work without any issues. Hope you find this useful.

Part 2 - Configure Epson S515W on Linux Mint / Ubuntu 10.04

While the majority of settings are covered in my previous post here I found that each time I switched off my printer, it used to change it's IP address and I had to repeat Steps 7 to 16 each time. My printing and scanning needs are pretty limited so I